Nursing graduates from the Germantown campu Union’s Master of Science in Nursing degree offers exciting career solutions in nursing field - News Release | Union University, a Christian College in Tennessee

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Union’s Master of Science in Nursing degree offers exciting career solutions in nursing field

JACKSON, Tenn.Jan. 14, 2002 – Union University’s School of Nursing announces the first graduating class in the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) degree program.

Nursing graduates from the Germantown campus celebrate being part of Union University's first graduating Master's of Science in Nursing class at graduation held at Union's Jackson campus in mid-December.

Nursing graduates from the Germantown campus celebrate being part of Union University's first graduating Master's of Science in Nursing class at graduation held at Union's Jackson campus in mid-December.

“There is a serious gap throughout the country in preparing educators in the nursing field which could adversely affect healthcare in the future,” said Jill Webb, director of the graduate program and associate professor of nursing at Union. “We feel the graduate program is extremely important in combating that problem.”

According to Webb, the average age of nursing faculty members across the United States is 55.

“Master’s prepared nursing administrators can be instrumental in helping nursing care delivery systems remain competitive in the hectic economic and political environment of health care,” said Webb, explaining that the two tracks available, nursing education or nursing administration, are aimed at fulfilling two advanced manpower needs of the nursing discipline.

The M.S.N. degree’s course of study is similar to other university departments’ graduate programs, meeting one day a week and completing in four terms over a total of sixteen months. In addition to choosing one of the two specialty tracks, twenty-two hours of core and sixteen hours of specialty classes make up the degree requirements.

“The program is designed for the nurse who wants to move his or her career toward an educational role, or who wants to transition from a clinical setting to management,” Webb explained. “There have been so many advances in the healthcare industry, and as technology changes and grows, it’s imperative that we as healthcare professionals continue to improve our knowledge base. We have a responsibility both professionally and ethically.”

The first cohort of 26 students graduated December 15 with 11 from the Germantown campus and 15 from the Jackson campus. Several graduates have been accepted for educator positions at community colleges or four-year universities and some report either application to doctoral study or interest in doing so. Many graduates, said Webb, intend to remain with the same employer while awaiting advancement opportunities. The graduate program is fully accredited by the Collegiate Council on Nursing Education (CCNE) and is approved by the Tennessee Board of Nursing.

Applications are being accepted for the 2002 class which begins in August of this year. For more information about the M.S.N. program, contact Webb at (731) 661-5235 or 661-5538.


Media contact: Sara B. Horn, news@uu.edu, 731-661-5215

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