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Dockery to speak at Anderson inauguration, BGCO event

JACKSON, Tenn.Oct. 1, 2003 – Union University’s president is scheduled to deliver the inaugural address at the inauguration of Anderson College’s new president, Evans Whitaker, as well as deliver a series of speeches at a significant event sponsored by the Baptist General Convention of Oklahoma (BGCO).

David S. Dockery’s theme at the inauguration is “Renewing Minds and Changing Lives.” Dockery will draw his text from Romans 12:1-2. Dockery will address a distinctive identity, a distinctive purpose and a distinctive calling at the Oct. 3 event.

Whitaker will be formally installed as Anderson College’s twelfth president in the Henderson Auditorium of the Callie Stringer Rainey Fine Arts Center. Whitaker formerly served as vice president for university advancement at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn. Anderson is affiliated with the South Carolina Baptist Convention.

Hal Lane, president of the South Carolina Baptist Convention and pastor of West Side Baptist Church in Greenwood, S.C., will deliver the benediction.

After the inauguration, Dockery will travel to Oklahoma City, Okla. Where he will speak three times at Singles Innovation, sponsored by the BGCO.

The conference is designed for single ministers, pastors, education ministers, singles leaders and other leaders in church singles ministries.

A pastor’s session will address different ways to target, reach and minister to those in the postmodern generation.

Guests in addition to Dockery include Moses Caesar, pastor to single adults at Germantown Baptist Church, and William “Bud” Smith, professor of education and J.M. Price Chair of Religious Education at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas.


Media contact: Todd Starnes, news@uu.edu, 731-661-5215

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